Dr. Scott Morris

Rev. Scott Morris, Ms M.D., M.Div. is a leading voice in the rising faith and health movement. He is founder and CEO of Church Health in Memphis, Tennessee, the largest faith-based healthcare ministry of its type. For 30 years, he has spurred ecumenical and interfaith support among 200 congregations to provide quality healthcare to the uninsured population of Memphis working in low-wage jobs.

Lessons from Mr. Rogers

Of the many ways we should celebrate Mr. Rogers, I am drawn to his definition of love. He wrote “Love isn’t a state of perfect caring. It is an active noun like ‘struggle.’ To love someone is to strive to accept that person exactly the way he or she is, right here and now.”

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A Pink Pig – and Christmas

God has always been with us, and our charge is to recognize God’s presence now and always. We do not need to hope that all will be well, nor do we need to rely on luck or our own might to make life meaningful; we just need to look within to recognize that God has always been in charge and that continues to be the case.

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Church Health’s Role During 2018 Open Enrollment

For the next six weeks of open enrollment, Church Health’s HAT Team (Healthcare Advisory Team) will be working to enroll people who qualify for coverage through the ACA, Medicaid or Medicare. The team will also help those who do not qualify by helping them become patients here at Church Health, where we charge on a sliding scale and provide the same quality of care I would expect for my mother.

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This Place We Call Church Health

Today, I will see another mornings’ worth of people in the clinic. Who knows what God has in store for me and for us? What I do know is that there will be hardworking souls who feel desperate and who come to us. We will welcome them with open hearts and open arms, just as we have for 30 years at this place we call Church Health.

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Charlottesville

I graduated from the University of Virginia in 1976. I had not been back to visit until last fall when I took my wife, Mary, to see Thomas Jefferson’s university. The university itself had changed little, but the downtown and surrounding area was very different. It...

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I’m Moving to Crosstown Today

God’s imagination is truly bigger than we can see ourselves. In fact, the word imagination has the same root as the word magic. Magic creates a transformation that is extraordinary. Imagination allows us to make a difference in our lives so that we can live into the way God calls us into being. Both are part of what, I believe, is happening at Crosstown. At least for me, but also for Church Health.

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If Your Heart Is Like My Heart

The book tells Shane’s personal story and explores his discovery of the work of Church Health as he came to more fully understand the depth of what we do. My part is to tell stories of patients we have seen at Church Health over the years. Together, we provide suggestions about how you can advance your own search for God by becoming involved in health ministry.

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Facing Homelessness at Christmastime

Still, the moral dilemma of giving money to someone sitting on the street of an American city is something few of us ever come to grips with. Yes, we worry the person will just go buy beer. At the same time, we aren’t fully comfortable with just walking by, because there seems to be an unwritten tenet that no one in America should be forced to beg. On that, I think we could all agree.

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Disarming Fear

I was watching the Olympic trials last night when the local news broke in showing people blocking the bridge over the Mississippi River. A Black Lives Matter rally had turned into an act of civil disobedience of blocking traffic on I-40. It was remarkable to see this...

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Remembering Harry Peel

Harry Peel was a drummer. He played what John Kilzer sometimes referred to as a ”big bongo.” I loved to listen to his playing, but I was also one of his doctors.
I have to be honest: Harry was a terrible patient. He would nod along in agreement whenever I told him he needed to improve his lifestyle to better-manage his diabetes and his heart disease, but I knew he was probably not going to do it. He marched to his own beat. After all, he was a drummer.

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