Church Health at Crosstown Concourse

#WeWereBuiltForThis
Serving More People & Serving Them Better
Several years ago, the need for our services was exploding with no sign of slowing down. By 2010 we recognized that if we were to continue offering care to those most in-need, we would have to increase our capacity. We needed space for additional providers and support staff, and the configuration we had in place from our founding through late-2016 simply could not accommodate further expansion. We sought a purpose-built space that allowed us to fully implement our model of whole-person care on a larger scale, while squeezing the most out of every dollar.
Our solution: move to Crosstown Concourse, where our capacity and capabilities would expand dramatically.
One of Church Health’s original clinics, located on Peabody Ave.
Why Crosstown Concourse?
“This is not just a building; this is a beautiful passage of people, who together…are Crosstown Concourse.”

-Todd Richardson, Co-leader, Crosstown Concourse

When Sears, Roebuck and Co. opened a regional distribution and retail center in Memphis in 1927, the Crosstown neighborhood became a hub of movement and commerce that was sustained for nearly 66 years. Sears Crosstown was shuttered in 1993 due to the decline in the mail-order business, and until recently the hulking 1.5-million-square-foot building sat idle for 17 years, a shell of its past grandeur.

In 2010, Crosstown Arts formed to facilitate the redevelopment of the Sears Crosstown building using arts and culture as a catalyst for change. In 2012, Church Health signed on to become one of the founding tenants. We worked collaboratively with others around Memphis to populate the “vertical urban village,” recognizing that our work in providing healthcare for the traditionally underserved would be complemented and enhanced through partners and neighbors within the building.

1927 - Sears, Roebuck and Co.

Sears, Roebuck and Co. opens a regional distribution and retail center in Memphis’ Crosstown neighborhood.

1993 - Sears Crosstown Closes

Sears Crosstown is shuttered. The 1.5-million-square-foot building sits idle for 17 years, a shell of its past grandeur.

2010 - Crosstown Arts Forms

Crosstown Arts forms to facilitate the redevelopment of the building, using arts and culture as a catalyst for change.

2012 - Church Health Takes Notice

Church Health becomes one of the founding tenants and begins working collaboratively with others around Memphis to populate the “vertical urban village,” recognizing that our work in providing healthcare for the traditionally underserved is complemented and enhanced through partners and neighbors.

2014 - Groundbreaking

Crosstown Concourse breaks ground, commencing a three-year rehabilitation.

2017 - Church Health Moves

In March 2017, Church Health moves to its new home in Crosstown Concourse.

Revitalizing Our Community
Help us expand our commitment to heal, improve healthcare and inspire people to live their healthiest lives. Take our hand as we care for one another.

Church Health is a critical part of the social safety net and connective tissue that makes Memphis a caring community. Church Health, along with Church Health YMCA, Southern College of Optometry and many other partners in Crosstown, strengthens the fabric of our community because our setting enables us to work with outstanding partners in healthcare, education and the arts. Our partners extend our ability to engage our patients and members—body, mind and spirit – in the pursuit of healthy living.

Crosstown Concourse is more than just a building. It stands as a symbol of Memphis’ renewal and serves as an inspiration and guide to a modern, community approach to health, wellness and preventive care.

As a by-product of carrying out our mission more effectively alongside mission-driven partners, we are working to renew hope and breathe new life into the Crosstown neighborhood and surrounding areas, which are among the city’s most ethnically diverse and economically challenged.

Crosstown Concourse continues to grow as a vibrant hub where Memphians live and work, learn and teach, heal and are healed, create and recreate, shop and eat. Crosstown reinvigorates our city and its economy. At full capacity, as many as 1,300 people will work in Crosstown, while 450 will call it home. More than 2,500 people will use the building on a daily basis.

Church Health

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